JBI Composite Applications with JavaEE

Most of the JBI composite applications in OpenESB are written using BPEL Service Engine. This is because BPEL allows us to orchestrate various webservices. But what if one wanted to write a simple composite application without using BPEL. Let’s say someone wants to use an EJB WS as part of a larger composite application without invoking as an external webservice. By using Java EE Service Engine we will be bypassing the http layer. The JavaEE SE takes care of invoking EJB webservice from within a composite application. This blog is about creating a composite application only using Java EE SE. We will create an EJB WS and include it in a composite application. 1. Create an EJB Module 2. Name it as JavaEEEJBModule: 3. Right click on the newly created EJB Module and select “New Web Service”   4. When you click “Finish”, a new webservice with a default “hello” operation will be generated: 5. Right click on “Webservices” node and Click on “Generate and Copy WSDL”. 6. Select the conf folder under EJB. 7. Go to the newly generated WSDL, click on Design tab and add PartnerLink Type as shown below: 8. Select the Port type as JavaEEWS 9. Create a new Composite Application project:   10. Name it as JavaEEEJBCA. 11. Open the CASA editor by double clicking on “Service Assembly” under the composite application project 12. Drag the EJB Module into CASA Editor. It should look like this:   13. Right click on the composite application project and select “Clean and Build”. 14. After build succeeds, drag the soap icon from “WSDL Bindings” tab from Palette to...

File to File, Multi-record file Using File Bc

Basic “File to File, Multi-record file” Projects Written By Michael Czapski Updated by Mriganka Banerjee Introduction This document is intended to help you get over the initial hurdles of exploring Java CAPS 6/JBI and OpenESB. It walks through the process of creation, deployment and execution of a simple File-to-File integration solution, and a simple File to BPEL Process to File solution, with detailed step-by-step illustrations. Both solutions use inbound files with multiple records. The focus is the practice of using JBI components not the theory of JBI. This document addresses the integration solution developers, not developers of Service Engines or Binding Components. The projects use JBI components only, that’s why they are just as good for OpenESB exploration as they are for Java CAPS 6/JBI exploration. JBI (Java Business Integration) is not discussed to any great extent. JBI artifact names are used in discussion but not elaborated upon. Explanations are provided where necessary to foster understanding of the mechanics of developing integration solutions using JBI technologies in OpenESB and Java CAPS 6/JBI. Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB are two of a number of toolkits that implement the JBI specification (JSR 208). When I use an expression like “In JBI …” I actually mean “In JBI as implemented in Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB …”. The same things may well be implemented differently in other JBI toolkits. Java CAPS 6 “Revenue Release” is used and shown in illustrations. OpenESB can be used instead however the appearance of components shown in illustrations may vary somewhat. WSDLs Java CAPS 6 and OpenESB use WSDL to define message structures and interactions between Binding...

Throttling With BPEL SE

In this article, we have discussed about the throttling process in BPEL-SE. Article only explains the basics of throttling configuration in composite application. We suppose you already have worked on OpenESB and know basic components name like BPEL Process, Composite application, FTPBC etc. What is Throttling? In software, a throttling process, or a throttling controller as it is sometimes called, is a process responsible for regulating the rate at which application processing is conducted, either statically or dynamically. A throttling controller may be embedded in the application hosting platform to balance the application’s outbound publishing rates with its inbound consumption rates, Throttling in BPEL-SE In BPEL-SE, Throttling allows you to set the maximum number of concurrent messages that are processed by a particular endpoint. Increased message load and large message payloads can cause memory usage spikes that can decrease performance and OOM Error in Production Servers. Throttling limits resource consumption so that consistent performance is maintained. When Value of Throttling is set to 1, the binding components will process each messages serially. For example suppose FTPBC is executing one file, in between it will not pick any other file from polling directory. It means next message will be sent only after a response/acknowledgement is received for the first message. Configure Throttling To Configure Throttling, please follow below steps. · From the OpenESB IDE, Expand the composite application project window, and double click on Service Assembly node. The CASA Editor opens containing your composite application. In the CASA Editor, click the ‘QoS’ icon located on the link between your JBI Module and the WSDL port you want to configure. The...